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Dietitian
Medical Dietitian study help
Killexams : Medical Dietitian study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Dietitian Search results Killexams : Medical Dietitian study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Dietitian https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Fertility diet: What to eat if you’re trying to get pregnant

If you’re one of thousands of people currently struggling to conceive, swapping your usual diet for a fertility diet can be one simple lifestyle change that can boost your chances of becoming pregnant. 

While you can’t certain fertility, when it comes to how to get pregnant, you can make lifestyle choices that supply you the best chance. For both men and women, what you eat affects the likelihood of pregnancy. 

Popularized by Harvard researchers in 2007, the term fertility diet was coined after they noticed a pattern between the nutritional choices women were making and whether or not they became pregnant. Since then, research interest into the area of male and female fertility has boomed, resulting in an avalanche of information that can often feel overwhelming for those of us trying to conceive. 

To help make things a little easier, we’ve sifted through the research and consulted an expert for their perspective, unpacking the science behind the fertility diet so that you feel empowered to make informed decisions about what to eat — and what not to eat. 

Often, nutritional advice focuses solely on women. But it takes two to tango. It’s crucial to consider both partner’s food choices. We’ll cover what men and women should eat as part of a fertility diet — and the differences may surprise you. 

Seek advice from a health professional if you’ve been trying to conceive for 12 months if you’re a woman under 35, and six months if you’re over 35. If you suspect you might be pregnant or simply want to know what to look out for, our guide ‘Am I pregnant?’ outlines the early signs to watch for.

How does diet affect fertility?

According to the CDC, many factors influence fertility, including stress levels, exercise, and genetics. Nutrition also plays a significant role. By adapting your diet, you can feel more empowered and increase your chances.  

“A healthy diet correlates with better sperm quality, including sperm count,” says Theresa Gentile, registered dietitian and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Conversely, obesity and a high fat diet affect the structure of sperm and sperm count. Obesity also negatively affects female fertility.” 

Theresa Gentile, MS, RDN, CDN

Registered Dietitian

Gentile is the coordinator of the home enteral nutrition program at Maimonides Medical Center. She owns a nutrition consulting practice where she focuses on cardiac health and weight management by improving women's metabolism. Gentile earned undergraduate and master’s degrees from CUNY Brooklyn College.

The 2007 Harvard study published in the Obstetrics and Gynecology journal on the fertility diet scored the healthiness of women’s diets. They discovered a strong link between a healthy diet and a reduced risk of infertility.

Other research has confirmed similar findings with men. One review, published in Vitamin and Nutrition Research, concluded that men with unhealthy diets were more likely to have reduced sperm quantity and quality. 

If you want to become pregnant, the foundations of healthy eating still apply. You don't need to drastically change your diet if you eat well already. If there’s room for improvement, small changes make a difference.

What foods are good for fertility?

So what exactly does a fertility diet look like? A nutrient-dense, balanced diet can Excellerate your chances of becoming pregnant. Let’s break down the key components.  

Fruit and veg

No surprises here. Fill your plate with a variety of fruit and veg to maximize your nutrient intake. One 2018 study, published in Human Reproduction, linked low vegetable consumption with an increased time to pregnancy.

Healthy fats

Fats often get a bad reputation, but certain types are beneficial and have a place in a healthy diet. The secret? Focus on monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. These include avocados, olive oil, nuts, and seeds. 

“Monounsaturated fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids may have a beneficial effect on the growth and maturation of eggs and decrease the risk of not ovulating,” says Gentile.

With men, greater consumption of omega-3 fats is associated with better sperm quality, according to a 2012 study in Human Reproduction.

Whole grains 

Not only are whole grains associated with improved heart health, they can also raise your chances of conceiving. 

“In the Nurses' Health Study, women experienced lower risk of infertility if they consumed high amounts of whole grains, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated oils, vegetables, fruits, and fish,” says Gentile. Opt for choices like rye bread, quinoa, and brown rice. 

Lean proteins

If you want to conceive, lean proteins are a smart choice. One 2019 review published in the Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology journal found that eating a high proportion of plant-based protein relative to animal protein favored fertility in both men and women. If you eat meat, choose lean versions like fish and poultry rather than red or processed meats.  

Dairy

While a fertility diet is similar for men and women, you may be surprised by the differences with dairy. Consuming whole-fat milk can benefit female fertility, but men should stick to low-fat products like skimmed milk, according to the same 2019 review cited above. 

Are any foods bad for fertility?

So what foods do you need to minimize as part of a fertility diet? An unhealthy diet can increase inflammation, which reduces the chances of conception. “This inflammatory diet is characterized by high animal protein intake, saturated trans fatty acids and refined carbohydrates,” explains Gentile. “It is low in fiber and unsaturated fatty acids.”

Processed foods

If you want to conceive, minimize your intake of processed foods. These are often high in calories and low in nutrients. Watch out for processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, and refined carbs.

Processed foods often contain saturated and trans fats. “In women, trans fatty acids may increase insulin resistance and heighten the risk of diabetes, metabolic disorders, and polycystic ovarian syndrome, which can negatively affect fertility,” says Gentile. 

Trans fats can hamper fertility in men too. “They’re associated with poor sperm quality and lower sperm count,” she cautions. 

Try preparing your favorite meals using whole foods instead to avoid the feeling of missing out. 

Caffeine 

There is debate about whether or not caffeine has a negative impact on fertility. “Most research studies do not show an association between moderate coffee consumption and male fertility,” says Gentile. 

With women, the picture is different. “Much research indicates that high caffeine consumption may be associated with an increased time to achieve pregnancy and a heightened risk of pregnancy loss,” she adds.

Alcohol

Alcohol is linked to reduced fertility, though there’s uncertainty about what level increases the risk, according to a 2013 review published in the Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology journal. 

“An association between chronic alcohol consumption and poor semen quality has been reported in many studies,” says Gentile. “There is evidence that alcohol consumption, especially heavy drinking, correlates with reduced fertility and a higher risk of developing menstrual disorders.” 

This article is for informational purposes only and is not meant to offer medical advice.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 01:00:15 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/nutrition/fertility-diet-what-to-eat-if-you-e2-80-99re-trying-to-get-pregnant/ar-AA133YZU
Killexams : Meals catering to different health needs could help save lives—and billions of dollars

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” or so the old saying goes. Nutrition remains a powerful tool to prevent certain types of illness. The right food also play a role in helping serious or diet-sensitive diseases, like diabetes, HIV, and heart failure. A common way for those with illnesses like these is through medically tailored meals (MTM) customized and prepared for a patient’s needs. These meals can also be used for those facing food insecurity and those recently discharged from the hospital.

Meals catered to specific medical needs also have the potential to save a lot of money.

A study published today in JAMA Network Open finds that adding more programs that make and deliver MTMs could prevent hospitalizations nationally and save approximately $13.6 billion each year. The study used data from the 2019 Medical Expenditure Survey Panel Survey and other published research on the health impact of MTM programs. It found that implementing more of these programs around the country could also help prevent 1.6 million hospitalizations in addition to the huge cost savings. Most of the cost savings would occur within public programs like Medicare and Medicaid.

[Related: 5 nutrition goals that are better than weight loss.]

Kurt Hager, a PhD candidate in the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition and Science and Policy program led the study. “Currently, MTMs are not a covered benefit under Medicare or Medicaid, so they remain unavailable to the vast majority of patients who might benefit from them,” Hager said in a press release. “For people with chronic illness and physical limitations that make it difficult for them to shop and cook for themselves, these programs are a highly promising strategy for improving health and well-being. The estimated reductions in hospitalizations and associated cost savings reflect that.”

The majority of MTM programs around the country are run by organizations like Community Servings, God’s Love We Deliver, and Food is Medicine. Representative Jim McGovern, D-Ma has also introduced the Medically Tailored Home-Delivered Meals Demonstration Pilot Act of 2021, a pilot program for the the largest-ever MTM program under Medicare. They are currently funded though a mixture of by grants, donations, and Section 1115 waivers under Medicaid. The meals also often serve those with lower incomes and limited mobility, as well as individuals who regularly experience food insecurity. Most programs deliver five lunches and five dinner per week to eligible patients.

[Related: Unscrambling the health effects of eggs.]

“Food is not just for prevention–it can be used for treatment for people with debilitating conditions like heart failure, uncontrolled diabetes, HIV, and cancer,” Dariush Mozaffarian, a professor at the Friedman School and senior author on the paper, said in a press release. “With medically tailored meals, patients are treated using the power of food and put on a steady path toward healing. Our study suggests that expanding medically tailored meal programs nationwide—one key recommendation of the new Biden-Harris National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health—would help reverse our ‘sick care’ system, keep people out of the hospital, and save billions of dollars each year.”

Researchers form Tufts University are now working with Community Servings and University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School on a multi-year evaluation of MTM programs in Massachusetts. The work will study how these MTM programs impact obesity, diabetes, nutrition insecurity, and health care utilization in the state.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:00:00 -0500 Laura Baisas en-US text/html https://www.popsci.com/health/medically-tailored-meals/
Killexams : Could diet Excellerate immunotherapy outcomes in advanced melanoma?
  • Immunotherapy is a type of biologic therapy used to treat melanoma, a serious type of skin cancer.
  • Researchers from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands observed the dietary intake of 91 patients with advanced melanoma receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors, a type of immunotherapy.
  • Their study suggests that there is an association between eating a Mediterranean diet and an improved immunotherapy response rate to melanoma.

Immunotherapy is used to treat various cancers. It involves the use of drugs to prime the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a type of immunotherapy that blocks the actions of certain proteins.

In this new study, researchers asked patients with advanced melanoma receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors to document their dietary intake using questionnaires. The patients were also monitored using regular check-ups, including radiographic reviews.

Laura Bolte, study author and Ph.D. candidate at the University Medical Center Groningen, explained the objective of their study to Medical News Today:

“Importantly, this study was not a dietary intervention study. Patients were not put on a certain diet and followed-up but they filled in a dietary questionnaire prior to treatment through which we assessed their dietary habits.”

The researchers performed statistical analyses on the data obtained from the questionnaires to identify dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean dietary pattern.

They then associated these dietary patterns with treatment response and development of toxicity and found an association between the Mediterranean diet and the overall response rate.

“[P]atients who had a higher adherence to [a] Mediterranean diet, were more likely to respond to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors and to be progression-free at 12 months.”
— Laura Bolte, study author

The researchers highlighted that not all patients respond to treatment.

“Some patients develop drug-induced immune-related side effects such as colitis (inflammation of the gut). So the question is: How can we increase the response to immune checkpoint inhibitors to make more patients benefit? The relationship of immune checkpoint inhibitors with diet and the gut microbiome opens a promising and exciting opportunity to do so. Clinical trials investigating the effect of a high fiber diet, ketogenic diet and supplementation of omega-3 are underway,” Bolte said.

James Dobbyn, National Health Service senior research nurse and acute oncology clinical nurse specialist, who was not involved in this research, noted that a change in diet is “an empowering, non-pharmaceutical way for patients to help themselves through their cancer journey.”

Bolte pointed out that this study alone is not enough to make sweeping changes to melanoma patients’ treatment plans.

“Since this is an observational study, we do not derive causal relationships here, but show associations that need to be confirmed in clinical intervention studies,” she said.

Bolte told MNT that “while we need larger studies across multiple geographies, paired with higher resolution of food components to offer patient-tailored advise, we can already inform patients starting treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors about the potential importance of their diet.”

“Rather than having a focus on energy and protein requirements solely, this dietary counseling could be extended to overall dietary quality and nutrient demands such as fiber and fatty acids,” she added.

“The traditional principles of [the] Mediterranean diet remain the most widely studied and recommended dietary guideline. This dietary advice is already provided in many other disease contexts such as for diabetes and immune-mediated diseases and in public health information aimed at disease prevention. Patients can be referred to these resources,” Bolte said.

“There are also dietary guidelines for cancer patients eg from the National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society that overlap with the Mediterranean diet: emphasize consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts, and seeds, and pay attention to caloric and protein needs while limiting processed foods,” Bolte further explained.

“Dieticians could be involved in patient care as part of the multidisciplinary team of medical oncologists and other specialists.”
— Laura Bolte

James Dobbyn agreed.

“Dietary advice should be included in the patient information sheets for these drugs. This advice should also be routinely included in the patient counseling process prior to starting a course of treatment,” he said.

“In the real-world, healthier food is generally more expensive. Given the current cost of living crisis, we need to consider how patients can be supported in their healthier diet choices—if it is so important, the costs compared to the actual ICB drugs are minimal but likely highly significant for patients struggling in lower socio-economic groups and/or unemployed,” Dobbyn said.

“Oncology nurses will play a vital role in this aspect of patient, family, and carer education and support. They will also be able to signpost patients to financial support either through the benefits system or charitable support. The cancer charities will also need to be educated [on] the need for healthier lifestyle choices so that funding could be tailored to individual patient needs.”
— James Dobbyn

Finally, Bolte noted the importance of training all healthcare providers:

“An important way to implement dietary advice in clinical practice, in general, is by training doctors in important aspects of nutrition. All doctors should have a good answer on what is a healthy diet.”

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 01:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/could-diet-improve-immunotherapy-outcomes-in-advanced-melanoma
Killexams : Doing This When You Eat Could Help Prevent Alzheimer's, New Study Says

Surveys show that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most dreaded diagnoses a person can receive. In fact, according to the Alzheimer's Society, roughly half of people fear a dementia diagnosis, and 62 percent believe it would mean their "life is over."

However, the fact remains that few among us take active steps to prevent Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. The Mayo Clinic says that while there's no one way to definitively prevent Alzheimer's, evidence shows that there are several interventions which may, together, help lower your AD risk. These include following a healthy diet, exercising, not smoking, managing your blood pressure, avoiding head injuries, staying socially active, and more. Read on to learn about one additional intervention you can try when you eat, and why a new study says it may help prevent Alzheimer's.

READ THIS NEXT: Napping at This Time Boosts Your Brain Health, Study Says.

Certain dietary changes can help slash your Alzheimer's risk.

Though many factors may help lower your Alzheimer's risk, experts say changing your diet is one of the simplest and most effective things you can do, after getting daily exercise. "Many studies suggest that what we eat affects the aging brain's ability to think and remember," the National Institute on Aging (NIA) explains. "It's possible that eating a certain diet affects biological mechanisms, such as oxidative stress and inflammation, that underlie Alzheimer's. Or perhaps diet works indirectly by affecting other Alzheimer's risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease. A new avenue of research focuses on the relationship between gut microbes—tiny organisms in the digestive system—and aging-related processes that lead to Alzheimer's."

The organization emphasizes the importance of consuming fresh fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based, whole foods. "The Mediterranean diet, the related MIND diet (which includes elements designed to lower blood pressure), and other healthy eating patterns have been associated with cognitive benefits in studies," the NIA writes.

READ THIS NEXT: If You Can't Do This, You May Be at High Risk of Dementia, New Study Says.

Doing this when you eat could help prevent Alzheimer's, a new study suggests.

Some experts suggest it's not just what you eat, but also your portions and eating patterns, that make an impact on cognitive health. Once hunters and gatherers who experienced longer stretches of hunger between meals, many say that our uninterrupted access to high-calorie, highly processed foods increases our incidence of Alzheimer's.

Now, a latest study has explored the value of a fasting mimicking diet (FMD), one that essentially tricks the body into a fast-like state while still consuming calories, as a means for reducing Alzheimer's risk. Though the study used mice as subjects, researchers say the results suggest that this type of diet could, in fact, have a positive impact on cognitive health. The team observed that mice who underwent FMD cycles showed reductions in tau pathology and amyloid beta—peptides and proteins that form dementia-causing plaques in the brain—compared to mice eating a standard diet.

Here's what the plan entails.

Unlike most other fasting-related diet plans, the FMD plan has specific requirements about the nutrients you consume. "The fasting mimicking diet is a reduced-calorie diet with a specific macro- and micronutrient breakdown that makes your body think it's fasting while still allowing you to consume reduced amounts of food," Kristine Dilley, a dietitian at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Comprehensive Weight Management Clinic in Columbus, tells U.S. News&World Report.

A single cycle of FMD lasts for five days, and is typically repeated once per month. "On day one, you consume 1,100 calories. Of those calories, 11 percent should come from protein, 46 percent from fat and 43 percent from carbohydrate," explains U.S. News. "On days two through five, you'll consume just 725 calories per day, with a macronutrient breakdown of nine percent protein, 44 percent fat and 47 percent carbohydrate," the publication reports. People following a fasting mimicking diet should drink at least 70 ounces of water daily and avoid caffeine, they add.

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Other forms of intermittent fasting also appear to lower Alzheimer's risk.

Researchers have reached similar conclusions regarding other intermittent fasting diet plans, including time-restricted eating, alternate day fasting, and others. "In animal studies, intermittent fasting has been shown to increase longevity, Excellerate cognitive function and reduce brain plaque as compared with animals fed a regular diet," Allan Anderson, MD, Director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Tucson told the Alzheimer's Prevention Registry. "One hypothesis is that intermittent fasting enables cells to remove damaged proteins. It has been shown to delay the onset and progression of disease in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's."

Before trying any new diet plan—especially a calorie-restricting diet plan—always discuss it with your healthcare provider. "Intermittent fasting is not safe for some people, including people who are pregnant, children, people at risk for hypoglycemia or people with certain chronic diseases," the Cleveland Clinic notes.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 23:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/doing-eat-could-help-prevent-110151072.html
Killexams : How Healthy Diets Like the Mediterranean Diet Help Protect Brain Health
  • A new study finds that across different races and ethnicities, the metabolites from healthier diets may help protect brain health.
  • Diet is an important source of many metabolites, which can be markers of various aspects of our health.
  • Past research has found that certain metabolites — including lipids, amino acids, and steroids — are linked with cognitive decline and dementia.

New research from investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital has further confirmed what is already known about the link between diet and cognition — that what we eat can impact our brain health.

Metabolites from healthier diets, such as the Mediterranean diet, were associated with stronger cognitive function while metabolites from diets higher in sugar were associated with poorer cognitive function, according to the report, which was published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia onFriday.

The researchers also demonstrated that these findings can be generalized to different races and ethnicities.

“Research like this shows us that what we eat can have profound effects on brain function. Diet is about much more than just your weight; it impacts how your brain and body function and can have significant effect on your mental and physical health,” Dr. Christopher Palmer, an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Brain Energy, said.

The researchers wanted to understand how metabolites — substances produced in the body during digestion — impact cognition.

Different metabolites are produced by different kinds of foods and some are associated with positive health outcomes while other metabolites are consistently linked to worse health outcomes.

“Some metabolites are very healthy and good for us, (e.g. B12 helps in neurological function, which is why we want to make sure we get enough of it if we are vegan), and some of them are not so good for us (ribitol was an example from the study) and may negatively affect our cognition,” says Dr. Dana Ellis Hunnes, a senior clinical dietitian at UCLA medical center, assistant professor at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

The research team evaluated metabolite levels and cognitive function scores in 2,222 Hispanic and Latino individuals, 1,365 European people, and 478 African American people.

They then tested whether metabolites that have previously been linked to cognition in past research could be applied to the three different racial and ethnic groups involved in the study.

The research team found that six metabolites — four of which were sugars or derivatives of sugar — were associated with poorer cognitive function. Another type of metabolite, beta-cryptoxanthin, that is associated with fruit consumption and the Mediterranean diet was linked to stronger cognitive function.

The findings could be generalized across all racial and ethnic groups involved.

The researchers believe that metabolites may be biomarkers of an underlying relationship between diet and cognitive function. They didn’t find a strong casual relationship between metabolites and cognitive health, but hope future studies will explore how metabolites may directly impact cognition.

Paula Doebrich, MPH, RDN, a registered dietitian at Happea Nutrition, says the study should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations.

“This study merely underlines the importance of sticking to an overall healthy diet for long-term health but does not provide any specific data on what exactly we can do from a dietary standpoint to prevent cognitive decline,” Doebrich said.

While the study reaffirms that people who eat poorer quality diets may be at higher risk for chronic disease, the findings shouldn’t be used to make specific dietary recommendations, says Doebrich.

Other potential contributing factors that are known to impact cognitive health — such as socioeconomic status, physical activity and social support — were not included in the evaluation and sugar intake was never measured among the participants, making it difficult to identify specific dietary recommendations to boost brain health.

Diet is an important source of many metabolites, which can be markers of various aspects of our health.

“Generally, healthy plant-based food tends to have more of the healthy, safe, beneficial metabolites and less-healthy foods (highly processed) will have more of the less-safe, unhealthy metabolites that negatively affect cognition,” says Hunnes.

Past research has found that certain metabolites — including lipids, amino acids, and steroids — are linked with cognitive decline and dementia. Palmer says the body can occasionally have trouble processing large amounts of specific metabolites, which can have adverse effects on the body and brain.

It’s still unclear if and how metabolites directly impact cognition, however, the researchers say there is a clear association between cognition and various metabolites. In addition, metabolites may be helpful biomarker to help scientists better understand brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

According to the researchers, the relationship likely goes both ways — diet impacts our cognition and our cognition impacts our diet.

“This study was correlational, meaning that they didn’t prove that high blood sugars and sugar metabolites directly cause cognitive impairment. In fact, they found some evidence for ‘reverse causation,’ meaning that pre-existing cognitive impairment may influence people’s dietary choices,” says Palmer.

Ultimately, the findings underscore the importance of adhering to a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables.

“Eat more of the unprocessed, whole foods — like a Mediterranean diet — and fewer processed foods that are high in sugar or low in vitamins and minerals,” Hunnes said.

Doebrich recommends following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Make sure at least half of your grains are whole grains and swap half of your protein for plant-based sources, she adds.

“Keep in mind that cognitive health is tied to lifestyle habits beyond diet such as social interactions, having hobbies, good sleep hygiene, physical activity, or alcohol and substance abuse among others,” Doebrich said.

New research affirms that what we eat can impact our brain health. By analyzing levels of metabolites, or substances produced in the body during metabolism, researchers found that certain types of food are linked to better, or worse, cognitive health. Though it’s unclear how metabolites directly impact cognitive function, the findings show there is an underlying relationship between the two and highlights the importance of eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.healthline.com/health-news/how-healthy-diets-like-the-mediterranean-diet-help-protect-brain-health
Killexams : 'Medically tailored' meals can avert hospital stays, save billions, study says Delivering "medically tailored" meals to seriously ill people in the United States could help avoid 1.6 million hospitalizations annually and save nearly $13.6 billion per year, a Tufts University study estimates. Photo by RitaE/Pixabay © RitaE/Pixabay Delivering "medically tailored" meals to seriously ill people in the United States could help avoid 1.6 million hospitalizations annually and save nearly $13.6 billion per year, a Tufts University study estimates. Photo by RitaE/Pixabay

Oct. 17 (UPI) -- Delivering "medically tailored" meals to seriously ill people in the United States could help avoid 1.6 million hospitalizations annually and save nearly $13.6 billion per year, a Tufts University study estimates.

The study's findings appeared Monday in JAMA Network Open.

"For people with chronic illness and physical limitations that make it difficult for them to shop and cook for themselves, these programs are a highly promising strategy for improving health and well-being. The estimated reductions in hospitalizations and associated cost savings reflect that," researcher Kurt Hager, a doctoral candidate in Tufts' Food and Nutrition Policy and Programs program, said in a news release.

The idea is to deliver healthy, home-delivered meals that are customized and fully prepared to individuals living with complex, diet-related diseases, including diabetes, heart failure, end-stage renal disease, HIV and cancer, the release said.

Often, the meals support seriously ill individuals with lower incomes and limited mobility, as well as people who regularly experience food insecurity. Programs typically deliver 10 meals per week -- five lunches and five dinners -- to eligible patients.

However, medically tailored meals are not a covered benefit under Medicare or Medicaid, so researchers from Tufts University set out to estimate the potential impact of extending insurance coverage for these meals nationally.

The National Institutes of Health funded the study.

The economic analysis, which included eligible U.S. adults enrolled in Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance, looked at the potential impact of national implementation of 10 nutritionally customized meals per week for roughly eight months in each year for patients with diet-sensitive conditions and activity limitations to arrive at its estimates.

Data were drawn from a nationally representative survey on healthcare utilization and costs for American adults, the 2019 Medical Expenditure Survey Panel Survey, and from previously published research on the impact of MTM interventions, the release said.

At the 2019 baseline, an estimated 6.3 million U.S. adults, averaging 68 years old, were eligible to receive medically tailored meals. Seven in 10 had cardiovascular diseases, 44.9% had diabetes, and 37.2% had cancer.

If all eligible individuals received these meals, an estimated 1.59 million hospitalizations and $38.7 billion in health care expenditures could potentially be averted in a single year, the researchers said.

They then subtracted estimated program costs of $24.8 billion to arrive at a net savings figure of $13.6 billion from a healthcare perspective.

Over 10 years, in 2019 dollars, the meals intervention was anticipated to cost $298.7 billion and to potentially avert almost 18.3 million hospitalizations. That would reduce healthcare expenditures by $484.5 billion for net savings of $185.1billion.

 

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Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:00:04 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/medically-tailored-meals-can-avert-hospital-stays-save-billions-study-says/ar-AA133JiQ
Killexams : New Study Finds The Mediterranean Diet May Help To Excellerate Melanoma Survival Grilled avocado with herbs and tomatoes © Svetlana Monyakova/Shutterstock Grilled avocado with herbs and tomatoes

The plant-based Mediterranean diet can stabilize blood sugar, Excellerate your heart, and protect against cognitive decline (via Healthline). According to a new study presented at United European Gastroenterology's annual conference, the Mediterranean diet can also Excellerate the immune response and 12-month survival of patients with advanced melanoma. The researchers tracked the diets of 91 melanoma patients through a questionnaire, finding that the immune system's response was higher for people who ate more fish, nuts, whole grains, vegetables, and fruit. Eating whole grains and legumes also reduced the toxicity of the drugs used to treat melanoma. The researchers also found that drug toxicity increased if the melanoma patients ate more red or processed meats.

In a news release about the study, author Laura Bolte from University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands said that diet and the gut microbiome provide more opportunities to enhance the immune system. "Our study underlines the importance of dietary assessment in cancer patients starting ICI treatment and supports a role for dietary strategies to Excellerate patient outcomes and survival," Bolte said. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors (ICI) are drugs that elicit the immune system to attack cancer.

Bowl filled with grilled vegetables © Creative Cat Studio/Shutterstock Bowl filled with grilled vegetables

According to the Mayo Clinic, the Mediterranean diet focuses on whole grains, vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts, and seeds. Because the main source of fat comes from olive oil, this monounsaturated fat helps lower cholesterol. People who adhere to the Mediterranean diet will have moderate amounts of fish, dairy, and poultry but limit sugary foods and red meat.

In a 2020 systematic review in the European Journal of Nutrition, 117 research studies involving more than 3 million participants found that adhering to the Mediterranean diet lowers the risk of dying from cancer. The Mediterranean diet can also reduce your risk of colorectal, breast, head and neck, respiratory, gastric, bladder, and liver cancers.

According to Harvard Medical School, the Mediterranean diet's emphasis on healthy fats from olive oil, nuts, and fatty fish can cut the risk of type 2 diabetes. The antioxidants found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains protect the body from chronic disease. Limiting red and processed meats and focusing on fish and plant-based foods also help in healthy aging.

Read this next: 12 Sources Of Healthy Fats You Should Be Eating

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 05:18:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/new-study-finds-the-mediterranean-diet-may-help-to-improve-melanoma-survival/ar-AA12NUSc
Killexams : Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market 2022 Key Product Segments, Application Analysis, and Industry Growth Forecast by 2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Oct 12, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- Number of Tables and Figures :143 | The global "Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market"size is projected to reach Multimillion USD by 2028, In comparison to 2021, at unexpected CAGR during 2022-2028 and generated magnificent revenue. The market is segmented on the basis of End-user Industry (Oncology, Burn Department, Gastroenterology, General Surgery), By Type (Touch Screen, Button), and Geography (Asia-Pacific, North America, Europe, South America, and Middle-East and Africa).

Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Research Report is spread across 96 Pages and provides exclusive data, information, vital statistics, trends, and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Enteral nutrition pumps are devices used to deliver nutritive food directly to a patient’s stomach or intestine. Enteral nutrition pumps are highly useful in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients suffering from chronic diseases such as AIDS and cancer, as these patients usually suffer from nutritional insufficiency and may also have difficulty in consuming food.

Highlights

The global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market is projected to reach USD million by 2028 from an estimated USD million in 2022, at a Impressive CAGR during 2023 and 2028.

North American market for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to reach USD million by 2028, at a Impressive CAGR during the forecast period of 2023 through 2028.

Asia-Pacific market for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to reach USD million by 2028, at a Impressive CAGR during the forecast period of 2022 through 2028.

The major global manufacturers of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump include Fresenius SE and Co. KGaA, Moog, Inc., Abbott Laboratories, Halyard Health, Inc., Covidien PLC, C. R. Bard, Inc., B. Braun Melsungen AG, Cook Medical and Nestlé S.A, etc. In 2021, the world's top three vendors accounted for approximately % of the revenue.

The global market for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump in Oncology is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to USD million by 2028, at a Impressive CAGR during the forecast period of 2022 through 2028.

Considering the economic change due to COVID-19 and Russia-Ukraine War Influence, Touch Screen, which accounted for % of the global market of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump in 2021, is expected to reach million USD by 2028, growing at a revised Impressive CAGR from 2022 to 2028.

Report Scope

This report aims to provide a comprehensive presentation of the global market for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump, with both quantitative and qualitative analysis, to help readers develop business/growth strategies, assess the market competitive situation, analyze their position in the current marketplace, and make informed business decisions regarding Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump.

The Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market size, estimations, and forecasts are provided in terms of sales volume (K Units) and revenue (USD millions), considering 2021 as the base year, with history and forecast data for the period from 2017 to 2028. This report segments the global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market comprehensively. Regional market sizes, concerning products by types, by application, and by players, are also provided. The influence of COVID-19 and the Russia-Ukraine War were considered while estimating market sizes.

For a more in-depth understanding of the market, the report provides profiles of the competitive landscape, key competitors, and their respective market ranks. The report also discusses technological trends and new product developments.

The report will help the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump manufacturers, new entrants, and industry chain related companies in this market with information on the revenues, sales volume, and average price for the overall market and the sub-segments across the different segments, by company, product type, application, and regions.

Key Companies and Market Share Insights

In this section, the readers will gain an understanding of the key players competing. This report has studied the key growth strategies, such as innovative trends and developments, intensification of product portfolio, mergers and acquisitions, collaborations, new product innovation, and geographical expansion, undertaken by these participants to maintain their presence. Apart from business strategies, the study includes current developments and key financials. The readers will also get access to the data related to global revenue, price, and sales by manufacturers for the period 2017-2022. This all-inclusive report will certainly serve the clients to stay updated and make effective decisions in their businesses.

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COVID-19 IMPACT ON MARKET

The outbreak of COVID-19 has severely impacted the overall supply chain of the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market. The halt in production and end use sector operations have affected the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market. The pandemic has affected the overall growth of the industry In 2020 and at the start of 2021, Sudden outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic had led to the implementation of stringent lockdown regulations across several nations resulting in disruptions in import and export activities of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump.

COVID-19 can affect the global economy in three main ways: by directly affecting production and demand, by creating supply chain and market disruption, and by its financial impact on firms and financial markets. Our analysts monitoring the situation across the globe explains that the market will generate remunerative prospects for producers post COVID-19 crisis. The report aims to provide an additional illustration of the latest scenario, economic slowdown, and COVID-19 impact on the overall industry.

Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on this industry.

TO KNOW HOW COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND RUSSIA UKRAINE WAR WILL IMPACT THIS MARKET - REQUEST SAMPLE

Who are the key Players in the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market?

● Fresenius SE and Co. KGaA
● Moog, Inc.
● Abbott Laboratories
● Halyard Health, Inc.
● Covidien PLC
● C. R. Bard, Inc.
● B. Braun Melsungen AG
● Cook Medical
● Nestlé S.A
● ConMed Corporation
● MEDCAPTAIN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.

Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Development Strategy Pre and Post COVID-19, by Corporate Strategy Analysis, Landscape, Type, Application, and Leading 20 Countries covers and analyzes the potential of the global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump industry, providing statistical information about market dynamics, growth factors, major challenges, PEST analysis and market entry strategy Analysis, opportunities and forecasts. The biggest highlight of the report is to provide companies in the industry with a strategic analysis of the impact of COVID-19. At the same time, this report analyzed the market of leading 20 countries and introduce the market potential of these countries.

It also provides accurate information and cutting-edge analysis that is necessary to formulate an ideal business plan, and to define the right path for rapid growth for all involved industry players. With this information, stakeholders will be more capable of developing new strategies, which focus on market opportunities that will benefit them, making their business endeavors profitable in the process.

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Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market 2022 is segmented as per type of product and application. Each segment is carefully analyzed for exploring its market potential. All of the segments are studied in detail on the basis of market size, CAGR, market share, consumption, revenue and other vital factors.

Which product segment is expected to garner highest traction within the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market In 2022:

● Touch Screen
● Button

Which are the key drivers supporting the growth of the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump market?

● Oncology
● Burn Department
● Gastroenterology
● General Surgery
● Others

Which region is expected to hold the highest market share in the Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market?

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

This Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Research/Analysis Report Contains Answers to your following Questions

● Which Manufacturing Technology is used for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump? What Developments Are Going On in That Technology? Which Trends Are Causing These Developments? ● Who Are the Global Key Players in This Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market? What are Their Company Profile, Their Product Information, and Contact Information? ● What Was Global Market Status of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market? What Was Capacity, Production Value, Cost and PROFIT of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market? ● What Is Current Market Status of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industry? What’s Market Competition in This Industry, Both Company, and Country Wise? What’s Market Analysis of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market by Taking Applications and Types in Consideration? ● What Are Projections of Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industry Considering Capacity, Production and Production Value? What Will Be the Estimation of Cost and Profit? What Will Be Market Share, Supply and Consumption? What about Import and Export? ● What Is Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Chain Analysis by Upstream Raw Materials and Downstream Industry? ● What Is Economic Impact On Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industry? What are Global Macroeconomic Environment Analysis Results? What Are Global Macroeconomic Environment Development Trends? ● What Are Market Dynamics of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market? What Are Challenges and Opportunities? ● What Should Be Entry Strategies, Countermeasures to Economic Impact, and Marketing Channels for Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industry?

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

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Major Points from Table of Contents:

Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Research Report 2022-2026, by Manufacturers, Regions, Types and Applications

1 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Overview

1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump
1.2 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type 2022 VS 2028
1.3 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption Comparison by Application: 2022 VS 2028
1.4 Global Market Growth Prospects
1.4.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.4.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5 Global Market Size by Region
1.5.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2017 VS 2021 VS 2028
1.5.2 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.3 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.4 China Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.5 Japan Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers
2.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Revenue Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.3 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
2.4 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Average Price by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.5 Manufacturers Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types
2.6 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Competitive Situation and Trends
2.6.1 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Concentration Rate
2.6.2 Global 5 and 10 Largest Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Players Market Share by Revenue
2.6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production by Region
3.1 Global Production of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Revenue Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.3 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.4 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production
3.4.1 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.4.2 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.5 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production
3.5.1 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.5.2 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.6 China Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production
3.6.1 China Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.6.2 China Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.7 Japan Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production
3.7.1 Japan Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.7.2 Japan Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

4 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Region
4.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Region
4.1.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Region
4.1.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption Market Share by Region
4.2 North America
4.2.1 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Country
4.2.2 U.S.
4.2.3 Canada
4.3 Europe
4.3.1 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Country
4.3.2 Germany
4.3.3 France
4.3.4 U.K.
4.3.5 Italy
4.3.6 Russia
4.4 Asia Pacific
4.4.1 Asia Pacific Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Region
4.4.2 China
4.4.3 Japan
4.4.4 South Korea
4.4.5 China Taiwan
4.4.6 Southeast Asia
4.4.7 India
4.4.8 Australia
4.5 Latin America
4.5.1 Latin America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Consumption by Country
4.5.2 Mexico
4.5.3 Brazil

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5 Segment by Type
5.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Revenue Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.3 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Price by Type (2017-2022)
6 Segment by Application
6.1 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.2 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Revenue Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.3 Global Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Price by Application (2017-2022)

7 Key Companies Profiled
7.1 Information
7.1.2 Product Portfolio
7.1.3 Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
7.1.4 Main Business and Markets Served
7.1.5 latest Developments/Updates

8 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Manufacturing Cost Analysis
8.1 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Key Raw Materials Analysis
8.1.1 Key Raw Materials
8.1.2 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump
8.4 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers
9.1 Marketing Channel
9.2 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Distributors List
9.3 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Customers

10 Market Dynamics
10.1 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Industry Trends
10.2 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Drivers
10.3 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Challenges
10.4 Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Market Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast
11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Region (2023-2028)
11.2 North America Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.3 Europe Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.4 China Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.5 Japan Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast
12.1 Global Forecasted Demand Analysis of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump
12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Country
12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Country
12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Region
12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Country

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2023-2028)
13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.3 Global Forecasted Price of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Type (2023-2028)
13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.1 Global Forecasted Production of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.3 Global Forecasted Price of Medical Enteral Nutrition Pump by Application (2023-2028)

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source
15.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.1 Research Programs/Design
15.1.2 Market Size Estimation
15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation
15.2 Data Source
15.2.1 Secondary Sources
15.2.2 Primary Sources
15.3 Author List
15.4 Disclaimer

Continued...

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Tue, 11 Oct 2022 18:16:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/medical-enteral-nutrition-pump-market-2022-key-product-segments-application-analysis-and-industry-growth-forecast-by-2028-2022-10-12
Killexams : Mediterranean diet may not reduce risk of dementia, study suggests The Mediterranean diet -- which includes lots of vegetables, fruits, fish and healthy fats and little dairy or meat -- has been touted as brain-protective. But Swedish researchers now say it appears not to be. Photo by pastel100/Pixabay © pastel100/Pixabay The Mediterranean diet -- which includes lots of vegetables, fruits, fish and healthy fats and little dairy or meat -- has been touted as brain-protective. But Swedish researchers now say it appears not to be. Photo by pastel100/Pixabay

A healthy diet might not protect you from dementia as some have suggested, according to a new Swedish study.

The Mediterranean diet -- which includes lots of vegetables, fruits, fish and healthy fats and little dairy or meat -- has been touted as brain-protective. But Swedish researchers now say it appears not to be. Others, however, say these new results need to be taken with a grain of salt.

Heather Snyder, vice president of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer's Association, isn't convinced that the findings published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology are conclusive.

"It is critically important to better understand the links between diet and nutrition and dementia risk," Snyder said.

These new results should be considered in the bigger context of the ongoing work, said Snyder who had no part in the study.

"This is an observational study that can find an association between factors but does not prove causation," she said. "For that, we need an intervention study; fortunately, there are studies today that are testing dietary and nutrition-related interventions."

Snyder said existing data suggest that strategies to reduce dementia risk should be considered in combination, not one at a time. As such, the Alzheimer's Association is leading the U.S. POINTER Study, a two-year clinical trial to evaluate whether lifestyle interventions that simultaneously target multiple risk factors can protect mental function in older, at-risk adults.

"The connections between diet and dementia risk must be examined in multiple studies across multiple populations and even multiple countries - which, as a result, may yield different results," she noted.

For the new study, a team at Lund University led by Dr. Isabelle Glans collected data on 28,000 Swedes without dementia (average age: 58). Over 20 years, 7% developed dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.

When researchers examined participants' diets, they found no difference in dementia risk between those who ate a conventional or Mediterranean diet.

"While our study does not rule out a possible association between diet and dementia, we did not find a link in our study, which had a long follow-up period, included younger participants than some other studies and did not require people to remember what foods they had eaten regularly years before," Glans said in a prepared statement.

Samantha Heller, a senior clinical nutritionist at NYU Langone Health in New York City, added that evidence for the effects of diet on the risk of various dementias is conflicting.

"Contrary to the conclusions of this large study, there are studies that have found a decreased risk for dementias and cognitive decline with adherence to the Mediterranean diet," said Heller, who reviewed the findings. "It is important to look at the bigger picture, which is the overall effect of dietary patterns on disease risk and quality of life."

She said there is much evidence to suggest that a healthy eating pattern significantly reduces the risk of or helps manage several chronic, often preventable, diseases. Among them: heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, certain cancers, kidney disease and cognitive (mental) decline, Heller said.

She pointed to such eating patterns as MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay); DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension); Mediterranean; or other plant-based regimens.

"Eating a variety of whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, nuts and other high-fiber foods helps ensure our bodies and brains are getting the nutrients they need to stay healthy and fight disease," Heller said. "Keeping physically and mentally active and getting enough sleep also helps Excellerate brain health."

The study and an accompanying editorial were published online Oct. 12 in the journal Neurology.

Dr. Nils Peters of University Hospital Basel in Switzerland co-wrote the editorial.

"Diet as a singular factor may not have a strong enough effect on cognition, but is more likely to be considered as one factor embedded with various others, the sum of which may influence the course of cognitive function," he wrote, citing diet, regular exercise, controlling heart risk factors, avoiding tobacco and drinking in moderation as among them.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about diet and dementia.

Copyright © 2022 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

 

Read More

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 05:04:58 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/mediterranean-diet-may-not-reduce-risk-of-dementia-study-suggests/ar-AA12VsjK
Killexams : The #1 Supplement To Help Prevent Osteoporosis Later in Life, New Study Finds

Taking care of your bones is an important part of keeping your body in great shape as you get older. When a person loses bone density or mass as they age, they may develop osteoporosis, according to the NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center.

The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion also notes that osteoporosis is a disease that affects around 10 million people in the United States who are 50 years old or older. Beyond that, over 43 million people are at risk of osteoporosis due to low bone mass. While that might be cause for concern, a report has found that taking calcium supplements when you're younger may help to prevent osteoporosis when you are older.

Read on to learn more about the research findings, and for more healthy aging tips check out 4 Healthy Brain Foods Recommended by a Neurologist.

calcium

In the eLife study, researchers from Wenzhou Medical University in China took a look at 43 randomized controlled trials that involved a total of over 7,300 participants under 35 years old. The trials focused on the effect of calcium alone, or calcium plus vitamin D, on bone mineral density as well as bone mineral content compared to either a placebo or a lack of treatment. Of the 43 trials, 23 concentrated on participants who relied on their diet for calcium, while 20 trials involved calcium supplementation.

The findings showed that taking calcium supplements before the age of 35 could benefit both the bone mineral density in the femoral neck and bone mineral content in the lumbar spine. There was also an improvement in both the bone mineral density and bone mineral content of the overall body.

Eat this, not that


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"[I]ntervention before young adults reach peak bone density might have a greater impact on bone health and prevent osteoporosis later," said lead author Yupeng Liu, a researcher at the School of Public Health and Management, Wenzhou Medical University, China, according to EurekAlert!

"These study findings are exciting, as they shift our lens toward a preventative healthcare approach instead of a curative approach, where we only focus on health measures after experiencing disease and illness," Megan Wong, RD, registered dietitian at AlgaeCal, who specializes in nutrition for osteoporosis and overall chronic disease management, tells Eat This, Not That!

RELATED: Popular Foods With More Calcium Than a Glass of Milk

This report's findings also highlight the importance of starting to care for your bone health at an earlier age than many may suspect.

"Peak bone mass, which is when your bone density will be at its highest, is achieved around the ages of 25 to 30. It slowly goes downhill from there and, starting at the age of 40, we naturally lose around 1% of our bone density per year," Wong says. "This is why it's crucial to build up bone mass in your younger years. The more bone mass you start with, the less likely this natural bone loss will lead to osteoporosis and fractures."

Wong also notes that "calcium itself isn't enough to protect our bones." Indeed, "in order for calcium to be properly absorbed and effectively do its job, it needs 'helper' nutrients." Because of that, "when you're shopping around for a calcium supplement, steer clear of ones that provide only calcium and look for added nutrients like vitamin D and magnesium."

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 06:30:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.style.yahoo.com/lifestyle/1-supplement-help-prevent-osteoporosis-183046951.html

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